Napoleon Series Archive 2004

Majalahonda

Hi!

Reading the article from Robert Burnham, in the Napoleon Series, about the combat at Majalahonda in 1812, I was struck by the phrase "Although, outnumbered 3 to 1, Gen. D'Urban orders is cavalry to charge..." !
I did not research further than the contents of the article but I was thinking why D'Urban had take such move in that situation.
He was in a great numerical disavantage (I think the portuguese charge with no more than 500 men); certainly he knew the limitations of the portuguese cavalry (a kind of medium cavalry, not like british dragoons); he had, just one km behind, two of the best heavy cavalry regiments in the allied army (KGL); he had orders from Wellington to be prudent and to wait that the main force come up closer to the advance guard.
So why D'Urban takes the decision to make a stand and charge?

Some thoughts of my one:

1. Was he a hot head and imprudent man?

2. He order the charge thinking that the french force was more weak? Maybe the second and third line of the french cavalry was not visible?

3. He was in a no way out situation, perhaps with the french already charging is force?

Some comments on this? I appreciate...

Moisés

Messages In This Thread

Majalahonda
Re: Majalahonda
Re: Majalahonda
Re: Majalahonda
Re: Majalahonda
Re: Majalahonda
Majalahonda; another source