Research: Abstract of the Napoleonic Era

 

Army:

Great Britain: The Scottish Fencible Regiments: 1759 – 1802

Name

Year Raised

Year Disbanded

Strength

Notes

Argyle Highlanders

1759

1763

1,000

 

Sutherland Highlanders

1759

 

1,000

260 Men were above 5 feet 11 inches tall; had two grenadier companies

Argyle Highlanders (Western)

1778

1783

 

700 men were Highlanders; rest were from Glasgow and SW Scotland

Gordon Highlanders

1778

1783

960

 

Sutherland Highlanders

1779

1783

1,100

 

Grant Highlanders

1793

1799

 

Strength unknown, however there were 41 Lowlanders, 3 English, and 2 Irish

Breadalbane Highlanders

1793

1st Battalion: 1798
2nd Battalion: 1798
3rd Battalion: 1802

2,300

 

Sutherland Highlanders

1793

1798

1,084

Had so many volunteers, they could not enlist all of them; many joined the 93rd Foot in 1800

Gordon Highlanders

1793

1798

 

150 men were from the Lowlands of Aberdeen, Banff, and Elgin.

Rothesay and Caithness Highlanders

1st Battalion: 1794
2nd Battalion: 1795

1st Battalion: 1799
2nd Battalion: 1802

1st Battalion: Unknown
2nd Battalion: 1,000

19 officers were six feet tall or taller

Dumbarton Highlanders

1794

1802

 

Reduced to 500 men in 1796

Reay Highlanders

1794

1802

800

600 had family name that began with Mac

Inverness-shire Highlanders

1794

1802

600

Only 350 were Highlanders

Fraser Highlanders

1794

   

300 soldiers had Fraser as family name; 30 Lowlanders, and 18 English and Irish

Lochaber Highlanders

1799

1802

800

740 were Highlanders

Clan-Alpine Highlanders

1799

1802

756

In 1799 all were Highlanders; in 1800 strength was 1230: 780 Highlanders, 420 Lowlanders, 30 English and Irish

Glengarry Highlanders

1799

1802

 

Over half came from the Glengarry Estate; regiment was known as a handsome body of men

Regiment of the Isles Highlanders

1799

   

All Highlanders; had large number of Donald Macdonalds.[1]

Argyle Highlanders

1799

1802

   

Source: An Account of the Scottish Regiments, with the Statistics of each from 1808 to March 1861.  Edinburgh: William P. Nimmo; 1862. Pages 45 - 47

Notes:

[1] Legend has it that when “. . . the sergeants of companies called over the muster-rolls, there having been so many Donald Macdonalds in each, that they had to be numbered.  The sergeants, therefore, used to commence in the Gaelic pronunciation and accent with Tonald Mactonald, No. 1; Tonald Mactonald, No. 2; Tonald Mactonald, No. 3, and so on, until the Tonalds were exhausted in each company, the voice being raised to a higher pitch, very amusingly, as they called out the name of each man.


Placed on the Napoleon Series: August 2008

 

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