Research Subjects: Miscellaneous


Peerage of England

Peerage of Scotland

Peerage of Great Britain and Ireland

Peerage of the United Kingdom and Ireland

Sources

Notes

The British Peerage in 1818: the Marquessates

By Stephen Millar

 

The title of marquess ranks second-highest in the British peerage, preceeding the titles of earl, viscount and baron. All ducal families either possessed marquessates prior to the monarch advancing them in rank or were given their marquessate at the same time as their ducal title (Robert Bertie, created 1st Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven on 26.07.1715, already held the title of 4th Marquess of Lindsey, but Scroop Edgerton, 4th Earl of Bridgwater, became Marquess of Brackley and Duke of Bridgwater on 18.06.1720).

Nineteen marquessates were created by King George III during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Eras; three non-ducal marquessates -- Antrim, Annandale and Clanricarde -- became either dormant or extinct.

The marquessate of Antrim was re-created by King George III on 18.08.1789 in the peerage of Ireland. The title was last held by Sir Randal William MacDonnell, 1st Marquess of Antrim (04.11.1749-29.07.1791), son of Alexander MacDonnell, 5th Earl of Antrim (22.07.1713-13.10.1775).

Created by King William III on 24.06.1701 in the peerage of Scotland, the marquessate of Annandale was last held by George Johnstone, 3rd Marquess of Annandale  (29.05.1720-29.04.1792). His older half-brother, James Johnstone, 2nd Marquess of Annandale, had attempted to disinheirit George and his brother John in 1726, but failed; George inherited the title on 10.02.1730. Legally changing his name to George van den Bempde-Johnstone in 1744, he was declared insane on 05.03.1748 and died, unmarried, in 1792.[1]

The marquessate of Clanricarde was re-created in the peerage of Ireland by King George III on 17.08.1789 for Henry de Burgh, 12th Earl of Clanricarde (08.01.1742-08.12.1797). At his death, the earldom passed to his brother General John Thomas de Burgh (22.09.1744-27.07.1808).[2]

In 1818, there were 32 marquessates: 1 in the peerage of England, 3 in the peerage of Scotland, 19 in the peerage of Great Britain and Ireland and 9 in the peerage of the United Kingdom and Ireland.

I. Peerage of England (until 1707)

One creation by King Edward VI of England (28.01.1547-06.07.1553):

29. Winchester (created 11.10.1551; England)

Charles Ingoldsby Paulet, 13th Marquess of Winchester (30.01.1765-29.11.1843), inherited his title from his father, George Paulet, 12th Marquess of Winchester, on 22.04.1800.

II. Peerage of Scotland (until 1707)

One creation by King Charles II of England (08.05.1660-06.02.1685):

30. Queensberry (created 11.02.1682; Scotland)

Sir Charles Douglas of Kelhead [5th Baronet] and 6th Marquess of Queensberry (1777-03.12.1837), inherited his title from William Douglas, 4th Duke of Queensberry, on 23.12.1810. The dukedom was inherited by Sir Henry Scott, 3rd Duke of Buccleuch.

Two creations by King William III of England (13.02.1689-08.03.1702):

31. Tweeddale (created 17.12.1694; Scotland)

George Hay, 8th Marquess of Tweeddale (01.02.1787-10.10.1876), inherited his title from his father, George Hay, 7th Marquess of Tweeddale, on 09.08.1804.

32. Lothian (created 23.06.1701; Scotland)

William Kerr, 6th Marquess of Lothian (04.10.1763-27.04.1824), inherited his title from his father, William John Kerr, 5th Marquess of Lothian, on 04.01.1815.

III. Peerage of Great Britain and Ireland (1707-1801)

Nineteen creations by King George III of Great Britain and Ireland (25.10.1760-29.01.1820):

33. Buckingham (created 04.12.1784, Great Britain)

Sir Richard Temple-Nugent-Grenville, 2nd Marquess of Buckingham (20.03.1776-17.01.1839), inherited his title from his father, Sir George Nugent-Temple-Grenville, 1st Marquess of Buckingham, on 11.02.1813.

34. Landsdowne (created 06.12.1784, Great Britain)

Sir Henry Petty-FitzMaurice, 3rd Marquess of Landsdowne (02.07.1780-31.01.1863), inherited his title from his half-brother, John Henry Petty, 2nd Marquess of Landsdowne, on 15.11.1809.

35. Stafford (created 01.03.1786; Great Britain)

George Granville Leveson-Gower, 2nd Marquess of Stafford (09.01.1758-19.07.1833), inherited his title from his father, Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Marquess of Stafford, on 26.10.1803.[3]

36. Townshend (created 31.10.1787; Great Britain)

George Ferrers Townshend, 3rd Marquess Townshend (13.12.1778-31.12.1855), inherited his title from his father, George Townshend, 2nd Marquess Townshend, on 27.07.1811.

37. Bath (created 18.08.1789; Great Britain)

Sir Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath (25.01.1765-27.03.1837), inherited his title from his father, Sir Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, on 19.11.1796.

38. Waterford (created 19.08.1789; Ireland)

Henry de la Poer Beresford, 2nd Marquess of Waterford (23.05.1772-16.07.1826), inherited his title from his father, George de la Poer Beresford, 1st Marquess of Waterford, on 03.12.1800.

39. Downshire (created 20.08.1789; Ireland)

Arthur Blundell Sandys Trumbull Hill, 3rd Marquess of Downshire (08.10.1788-12.04.1845), inherited his title from his father, Arthur Hill, 2nd Marquess of Downshire, on 07.09.1801.

40. Salisbury (created 24.08.1789; Great Britain)

King George III created this title for James Cecil, 7th Earl of Salisbury (04.09.1748-13.06.1823).

41. Abercorn (created 15.10.1790; Great Britain)

James Hamilton, 2nd Marquess of Abercorn (21.01.1811-31.10.1885), inherited his title from his grandfather, Sir John Hamilton, 1st Marquess of Abercorn, on 27.01.1818.[4]

42. Donegall (created 27.06.1791; Ireland)

George Augustus Chichester, 2nd Marquess of Donegall (13.10.1769-05.10.1844), inherited his title from his father, Arthur Chichester, 1st Marquess of Donegall on 05.01.1799.

43. Drogheda (created 05.07.1791; Ireland)

King George III created this title for Charles Moore, 6th Earl of Drogheda (29.06.1730-22.12.1822). Moore was promoted to Field-Marshal by King George IV in 1821.

44. Cornwallis (created 08.10.1792; Great Britain)

Charles Cornwallis, 2nd Marquess Cornwallis (29.10.1774-09.08.1823), inherited his title form his father, General Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis, on 05.10.1805.

45. Hertford (created 05.07.1793; Great Britain)

Francis Ingram Seymour-Conway, 2nd Marquess of Hertford (12.02.1743-28.06.1822), inherited his title from his father, Francis Seymour-Conway, 1st Marquess of Hertford, on 14.06.1794.

46. The County of Bute (created 21.03.1796; Great Britain)

John Crichton-Stuart, 2nd Marquess of the County of Bute (10.08.1793-18.03.1848) inherited his title from his grandfather, John Crichton-Stuart, 1st Marquess of the County of Bute, on 16.11.1814 (his father, John Crichton-Stuart, Baron Mount Stuart, died on 22.01.1794).

47. Wellesley of Norragh (created 02.12.1799; Ireland)

King George III created this title for Richard Colley Wellesley, 2nd Earl of Mornington (20.06.1760-26.09.1842). Wellesley was British Foreign Secretary from 1809 to 1812.

48. Thomond (created 29.12.1800; Ireland)

William OˇŻBrien, 2nd Marquess of Thomond (1765-21.08.1846), inherited his title from his uncle, Murrough OˇŻBrien, 1st Marquess of Thomond -- who died on 10.02.1808 as the result of an accident in London.

49. Headfort (created 29.12.1800; Ireland)

King George III created this title for Thomas Taylor, 2nd Earl of Bective (18.11.1757-24.10.1829).

50. Sligo (created 29.12.1800; Ireland)

Howe Peter Browne, 2nd Marquess of Sligo (18.05.1788-26.01.1845), inherited his title from his father, John Denis Browne, 1st Marquess of Sligo, on 02.06.1809.[5]

51. Ely (created 29.12.1800; Ireland)

John Tottenham (later Loftus), 2nd Marquess of Ely (15.02.1770-26.09.1845), inherited his title from his father, Sir Charles Tottenham of Tottenham Green [2nd Baronet], 1st Marquess of Ely, on 27.03.1806.

IV. Peerage of the United Kingdom and Ireland (1801-present)

Nine creations by King George III of Great Britain and Ireland (25.10.1760-29.01.1820):

52. Exeter (created 04.02.1801; United Kingdom)

Brownlow Cecil, 2nd Marquess of Exeter (02.07.1795-16.01.1867), inherited his title from his father, Henry Cecil, 1st Marquess of Exeter, on 01.05.1804.

53. Camden (created 07.09.1812; United Kingdom)

King George III created this title for John Jefferies Pratt, 2nd Earl Camden (11.02.1759-08.10.1840), a former Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (1795-1798) and Secretary of War and the Colonies (18.05.1804-10.07.1805).

54. Northampton (created 07.09.1812; United Kingdom)

King George III created this title for George Compton, 9th Earl of Northampton (24.03.1760-24.05.1828).

55. Anglesey (created 04.07.1815; United Kingdom)

King George III created this title for Lieutenant-General Sir Henry William Paget, 2nd Earl of Uxbridge (17.05.1768-29.04.1854).[6]

56. Cholmondeley (created 22.11.1815; United Kingdom)

King George III created this title for George James Cholmondeley, 4th Earl of Cholmondeley (11.05.1749-10.04.1827).

57. Conyngham (created 22.01.1816; Ireland)

King George III created this title for Henry Conyngham, 1st Earl of Conyingham (26.12.1766-28.12.1832).

58. Ormonde (created 01.1816; Ireland)

King George III created this title for Walter Butler, 11th Earl of Ormonde (05.02.1770-10.08.1820).

59. Londonderry (created 03.03.1816; Ireland)

King George III  created this title for Sir Robert Stewart, 1st Earl of Londonderry (27.09.1739-08.04.1821), the father of Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh (Foreign Secretary 12.03.1812-12.08.1822).

60. Hastings (created 13.04.1817; United Kingdom)

King George III created this title for Francis Rawdon, 2nd Earl of Moira (09.12.1754-28.11.1826).

Sources:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p1741.htm#i17410

http://www.freewebs.com/peerage/

http://www.stirnet.com/

http://library.wellcome.ac.uk/doc_WTL039920.html

http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/families/johnstones.htm

http://www.chinet.com/~laura/html/titles02.html

http://worldroots.com/

http://pages.prodigy.net/ptheroff/gotha/st_albans.html

http://www.hq69.dial.pipex.com/Pages/h_earl.html


Notes

 

[1] The marquessate of Annandale remains "dormant". The earldom of Annandale and Hartfell (created 1662) remained dormant until 1985, when the title of 11th Earl of Annandale and Hartfell was awarded by the House of Lords to Patrick Andrew Wentworth Hope-Johnsone [see Part 3].

[2] This marquessate was re-created again in 1825 by King George IV for the 13th Earl's son, Ulick John de Burgh.

[3] He was created Duke of Sutherland by King William IV on 28.01.1833.

[4] His father -- James Hamilton, Viscount Hamilton -- had died on 27.05.1814, aged 27.

[5] This marquessate is sometimes mis-spelled "Slingo".

[6] The Earl of Uxbridge was a cavalry officer who was wounded at the Battle of Waterloo (18.06.1815).

 

 

Placed on the Napoleon Series: May 2006; updated July 2006

 

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